Before you read on, note that the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), (previously the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD), requires prospective members to strictly follow a lengthy application process. This includes providing the association with an extensive amount of information within a certain period of time, as well as attending an interview. As such, FINRA says it is extremely important for a prospective member to understand the requirements, rules and procedures before beginning the process.

According to FINRA Rule 1010, some items that must be submitted include:

  • Form BD
  • A FINRA-approved fingerprint card
  • A detailed business plan
  • Documentation of regulatory, cival or criminal actions
  • A description of the prospective member's financial and supervisory controls
  • A copy of final or proposed contracts with financial intermediaries
  • And Much More... For the full list, please refer to FINRA Rule 1010 for more information.

Once the required information has been submitted on time, the prospective member is then interviewed by its Department of Member Regulation. From there, the department decides whether or not to accept the application based on whether the prospective member meets the standards set forth in FINRA Rule 1014.

Click Here to read detailed instructions from FINRA on "How to Become a Member of the NASD".

  1. Do financial advisors need to pass the Series 7 exam?

    The exact nature of a financial advisor's job responsibilities determines whether he must have a Series 7 license. If a financial ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How often do mutual funds report their holdings?

    The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) requires mutual funds to report complete lists of their holdings on a quarterly ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do financial advisors need to be approved by FINRA?

    The term "financial advisor" can refer to a couple of different roles. It most often refers to a broker-dealer or an investment ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does a broker decide which customers are eligible to open a margin account?

    Brokers have the sole discretion to determine which customers may open margin accounts with them, although there are regulations ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some of the major regulatory agencies responsible for overseeing financial ...

    There are a number of agencies assigned to regulate and oversee financial institutions and financial markets, including the ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why is the Nasdaq more heavily weighted to tech stocks than other stock exchanges?

    The Nasdaq became the world's first electronic stock exchange at its inception in 1971. The exchange's dedication to advancing ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    The 5 Countries That Produce the Most Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

    Learn about the top five countries, China, the United States, India, Russia and Japan, that are the largest contributors to carbon dioxide emissions.
  2. Economics

    Explaining the Tier 1 Leverage Ratio

    The Tier 1 leverage ratio measures a bank’s core capital against its total assets.
  3. Investing Basics

    What Is Schedule 13G Used For?

    Schedule 13G is an SEC form an investor must file upon taking ownership of 5% or more of a company’s outstanding shares.
  4. Investing Basics

    How to Vet Financial Advisors Via BrokerCheck

    Many people research restaurants or movies, but few select brokers or financial advisors with much research. Here's how BrokerCheck can help.
  5. Professionals

    Career Advice: Financial Planner Vs. Stockbroker

    Read an in-depth review of a career as a financial planner as opposed to a career as a stockbroker, including how to decide which is best for you.
  6. Insurance

    Airbnb Insurance: Will It Cover Enough?

    If a paying guest trips over a rug in your home, breaks an ankle and sues for damages, here's how to make sure your coverage protects you.
  7. Insurance

    5 (Possibly) Costly Risks of Being an Airbnb Host

    Guests who get injured or damage your neighbor’s property are just a couple of examples of what can go wrong. Here’s how to protect yourself.
  8. Investing News

    Mexican Energy, Telecom Reforms Please Foreign Investors

    Two years into his first term, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto is following through on radical campaign promises he made to Mexican citizens for sweeping multi-industry reform.
  9. Investing

    Top Cities Where Airbnb Is Legal Or Illegal

    Thinking of subletting your apartment on Airbnb? Make sure that you meet your city's regulations first.
  10. Term

    Understanding the Maintenance Margin

    A maintenance margin is the minimum amount of equity that must be kept in a margin account.
  1. Maintenance Margin

    The minimum amount of equity that must be maintained in a margin ...
  2. Security

    A financial instrument that represents an ownership position ...
  3. Series 6

    A securities license entitling the holder to register as a limited ...
  4. Emergency Banking Act Of 1933

    A bill passed during the administration of former U.S. President ...
  5. Slander

    Slander is the act of harming one person’s reputation by telling ...
  6. Libel

    Libel is publishing a statement about someone in written form ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Real Estate Investment Trust - REIT

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through property or mortgages and often trades on major exchanges ...
  2. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  3. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
  4. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  5. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  6. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!