A:

Yes. Your exam is valid for a period of two years. Under normal circumstances, in order to have you become licensed or registered, your sponsoring firm would have filed Form U-4 (in addition to meeting other requirements such as bonding, fee payment, and a background check).

However, since your employment was terminated prior to this point, you have two years to become employed by a member firm and become licensed. After this point, you may have to rewrite the exam. However, some jurisdictions have the discretion to waive an individual's requirement to rewrite after an exam has expired. This usually happens when the person in question has continued to work within the financial industry, but in a position that didn't require licensing. For more information, contact your State Regulator. A directory of State Regulators is listed here.

When you passed your Series 7 examination, the Central Registration Depository (CRD) permanently recorded your score. Therefore, your new employer will be able to verify that you successfully completed the exam and the licensing procedure can begin.

To read more about the Series 7, see Solving Mixed Options Problems On The Series 7.

RELATED FAQS

  1. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Find out more about forward contracts, call options, the mechanics of these financial instruments and the difference between ...
  2. What are the main risks associated with trading derivatives?

    Understand derivatives trading and learn about the primary risks usually associated with trading in the derivatives market, ...
  3. How can an investor profit from a fall in the utilities sector?

    Learn how an investor can profit from a fall in the utilities sector by employing speculation methods such as short selling ...
  4. What is the difference between derivatives and options?

    Learn how options are one type of derivative and how equity options derive their value from a stock, and understand other ...
RELATED TERMS
  1. Strike Width

    The difference between the strike price of an option and the ...
  2. Inverse Transaction

    A transaction that can cancel out a forward contract that has ...
  3. Reference Equity

    The underlying equity that an investor is seeking price movement ...
  4. Boundary Conditions

    The maximum and minimum values used to indicate where the price ...
  5. Delta-Gamma Hedging

    An options hedging strategy that combines a delta hedge and a ...
  6. Gamma Hedging

    An options hedging strategy designed to reduce or eliminate the ...

You May Also Like

Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    How does a forward contract differ from ...

  2. Options & Futures

    Tesla Stock Too Expensive? Trade Tesla ...

  3. Options & Futures

    Stock Options To Trade On Intraday Momentum ...

  4. Savings

    College Tuition vs. Investing: Is It ...

  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    4 Ways You Can Invest In Gold Without ...

Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!