5 Evolving Corporate Logos

AAA

Logos are a crucial piece of corporate image. The logo lays out the foundation of the brand and is, arguably, the most significant part of corporate branding. Logos generally evolve as the company grows and priorities shift. Today's most recognizable logos have not always appeared as they do today. Check out the transformation of corporate logos.

Microsoft

In August 2012 Microsoft rolled out a new corporate logo. It is the company's first update in 25 years. The original logo resembled disco lights and embodied the feel of the '70s era. Microsoft is in the process of refreshing the brand through substantial revisions to nearly all of its products.

The company says: "this wave of new releases is not only a reimagining of our most popular products but also represents a new era for Microsoft, so our logo should evolve to visually accentuate this new beginning." The new logo keeps the traditional four colors found in the previous logo, but has updated the wavy shape to four square boxes bearing the identical color scheme. The new image reveals a cleaner more classic design than the predecessor. This is only the fourth time Microsoft has updated the logo since the company was founded in 1975

EBay

The online auctioneer ebay unveiled its first logo change in September 2012. Since inception in 1995, eBay had never revamped its logo. EBay's Global Marketplaces President Devin Wong said the change reflects "a global online marketplace that offers a cleaner, more contemporary and consistent experience, with innovation that makes buying and selling easier and more enjoyable." EBay took a similar approach to Microsoft with a simpler, cleaner and classic design. The new logo still retains the traditional eBay color palette. However, the letters no longer have the floating appearance. The logo change was also part of an entire site redesign that is intended to provide the user with a cleaner and more intuitive experience.

Apple

The world's largest company may also have the world's most recognizable logo. Apple's logo is simple, but it symbolizes superior technology to many. The logo was not always as refined as the one shown on the back of every Apple device today. When the company was founded in 1976, the logo was extremely complex and detailed, and it portrayed an image of Isaac Newton sitting under an apple tree. The original logo, which was designed by Steve Jobs and Ron Wayne, was replaced the same year with one similar to the logo we recognize today. The new logo resembled an apple with a bite taken out and featured multiple horizontal colored bars running across the image. The colored bars were created to represent the Apple II computer being the first personal computer to reproduce images in color. Steve Jobs returned to Apple in 1997 as Apple prepared to launch the new iMac computer, and the company replaced the rainbow logo in 1998 with the monochrome logo it uses today.

IBM

International Business Machines (IBM) was formed in 1924 through a series of mergers. The original IBM logo contained the newly formed corporation name in the shape of a globe and was designed to represent IBM's worldwide expansion. IBM changed the logo in 1956 to simple lettering signifying a user-friendly image for the firm. The previous globe logo did not provide the friendly, caring image the firm was looking to portray. In 1972, horizontal lines replaced the solid lettering. The logo has remained virtually the same over the last 40 years. A 2010 list by Brandz places IBM as the second most valuable global brand.

Ford

One of the most iconic brands in American history began with a detailed logo far more convoluted than the symbol we recognize today. The complicated image bore the "Detroit-Mich." tag and spelled out "Ford Motor Co." That logo remained from 1903 to 1912. Then Ford replaced the logo with the oval design we identify with Ford today. The blue coloring was added in 1928, and the logo has only been slightly updated over the past 84 years.
  1. No results found.
Related Articles
  1. Small Business

    Explaining Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent.
  2. Small Business

    Understanding Brand Identity

    A brand identity comes from visible elements, such as the company name, the design of its logo, its packaging design, and colors, tagline and typeface.
  3. Small Business

    Understanding Product Lines

    A product line is a group of related products manufactured by the same company.
  4. Small Business

    A Career Guide For Marketing Majors

    Online content creation, print advertising, public relations, logo design, copywriting and website design are just a few marketing fields.
  5. Small Business

    Protect Your Creations--Register Your Trademark

    Federally registering your brand name or logo offers the broadest protection against potential trademark infringement.
  6. Small Business

    The Power Of Branding

    It's the ultimate economic moat, and we look at the approaches and effects of good and bad branding.
  7. Insights

    On Assignment Rebrands Company Image (ASGN)

    On Assignment rebranded the company’s logo and website to “bring it more in step with our industry,” CEO Peter Dameris said.
  8. Managing Wealth

    How To Start Your Own Private Foundation

    Private foundations can be time consuming and expensive to set up and operate.
  9. Insights

    7 Iconic Brands That No Longer Exist

    Understand the value of branding and what makes good brands great. Learn about seven iconic brands that failed and no longer exist.
  10. Small Business

    How Companies Create A Brand

    We take a hands-on approach to creating a brand, and see what it can mean as an investor.
Hot Definitions
  1. Free Carrier - FCA

    A trade term requiring the seller to deliver goods to a named airport, terminal, or other place where the carrier operates. ...
  2. Portable Alpha

    A strategy in which portfolio managers separate alpha from beta by investing in securities that differ from the market index ...
  3. Run Rate

    1. How the financial performance of a company would look if you were to extrapolate current results out over a certain period ...
  4. Hard Fork

    A hard fork (or sometimes hardfork) is a radical change to the protocol that makes previously invalid blocks/transactions ...
  5. Interest Rate Risk

    The risk that an investment's value will change due to a change in the absolute level of interest rates, in the spread between ...
  6. Ethereum

    Ethereum is a decentralized software platform that enables SmartContracts and Distributed Applications (ĐApps) to be built ...
Trading Center