6 Tax Myths Everyone Should Know
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Do Your Research

Think about what you'd really like to do on your vacation and create a list to narrow your choices - whether it's hitting the beach, going shopping, climbing a mountain or visiting a museum. Consider whether you can do this somewhere nearby, or whether you know anyone who has done your chosen activities before on a similar budget. Alternatively, travel agencies or even chat rooms on the topic can provide great advice on accommodations, places to dine, things to do and tourist traps to avoid. Internet sites such as Yahoo! Travel, Expedia and Priceline are often useful when seeking reasonable fares.

Don't you love a huge refund at income tax time? As it turns out, a big tax refund may make you feel good but it's not actually good for you. It means that way more than necessary was being withheld from your paycheck or, if you're self-employed, that your quarterly tax payments were much too large. The notion that large refunds are good is but one of the many enduring tax myths. Here are five others you should be familiar with.

Myth 1: Electronic Filing Causes Audits

Myth 1: People who file electronically are more likely to be audited.
The majority of returns are now filed electronically. Pretty soon, e-filing will probably be mandatory, so people have naturally begun to worry about the new system being more prone to audits. Yet, the IRS audit rate remains steady at less than 2% of all returns. The main audit triggers are the same as always, things like filing late, high self-employment income and math errors.

Myth 2: Filing Is Voluntary

Myth 2: Paying taxes is voluntary.
Saying that taxes are voluntary or illegal is a favorite argument of tax protesters to justify not filing a return. But to the IRS, "voluntary" simply means you get to do all the tax calculations yourself. We're all required by law to pay taxes. So, if you're thinking of becoming a tax protester, be aware that your chances of avoiding taxes are slim to none - and that you'll probably also be liable for late-payment penalties.

Myth 3: Taxes Are Too High

Myth 3: Taxes in America are way too high.
Our income tax system may not always be comprehensible or fair, but Americans don't pay the highest taxes by a long shot. Whereas our highest tax bracket for individuals in the United States is currently 35%, individuals can be taxed at 50% or more in Austria, Belgium, Cuba, Denmark, Japan, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The top bracket in Sweden is almost 60%.

Myth 4: Extensions Cause Audits

Myth 4: Filing for an extension increases your chance of an audit.
Most tax preparers say they haven't seen any link between filing for an extension and getting audited. If anything, filing for an extension reduces your risk of an audit because you buy yourself six extra months to make sure you get your taxes done right. If there aren't any math errors or other red flags, the IRS will be more than likely to pass you over for an audit.

Myth 5: All CPAs Are Tax Experts

Myth 5: All certified public accountants (CPAs) are income tax experts.
Just because you see "CPA" after someone's name doesn't necessarily mean he or she is an expert tax preparer. Although the CPA curriculum includes extensive income tax courses, not all CPAs go into tax prep or keep up on income tax laws. If you're in the market for a tax preparer and you're looking at CPAs, be sure they've actually got plenty of tax prep experience.

Conclusion

To say that the tax laws in America are voluminous and confusing is probably an understatement, so it's no surprise there are so many tax myths. The more aware of these myths you are, the more control you'll have over your own destiny as a taxpayer. (For more, see our Personal Income Tax Guide.)

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