5 High-Priced Apple Products


Since its inception in 1976, Apple has made premium products at premium prices. The sales strategy has never been designed to attract the low-end consumer. With consumers being able to buy PCs for only a few hundred dollars, Apple sells its cheapest computer for $599. The Mac mini sold for $599 does not include a display, either. The most expensive Apple product listed on the store's website is the 12-core Mac pro for $3,799. At these exorbitant prices, it is hard to imagine 17 million Apple computers, 38 million iPods, 40 million iPads and 93 million iPhones were sold in 2011 alone. Reports even surfaced in China that a teenager sold a kidney to buy Apple products. With the skyrocketing demand of anything Apple, many have profited off the demand by selling Apple merchandise on the auction block.

Apple Employee Hoodie

It appears no matter what the item is, if it bears the Apple logo someone is willing to pay top dollar for it. As a token of appreciation in 2011, Apple rewarded all employees at the Cupertino, Calif. head office with branded hoodies. One employee decided to put the item up on eBay along with an Apple beanie. The auction ended up closing for over $2,000. Even at the outrageous prices Apple sells products for, it may have trouble moving a $2,000 hoodie from store shelves. The buyer could have bought an iPad, 13" MacBook Pro or 27" iMac instead and he or she still would have had some change left.

20th Anniversary Macintosh

Introduced in 1997, the 20th anniversary Macintosh, nicknamed TAM, was released with a limited production run of roughly 12,000 units. Created by legendary Apple product designer Jonathan Ive, the computer was the cutting-edge technology of its day. TAM boasted a $7,499 price tag, making the computer one of the most expensive Apple computers ever released. Adjusting for inflation, the computer would cost over $10,000 today. Apple computers are nowhere near that price point today.

Andy Warhol Apple Logo

The famous artist sketched the legendary Apple logo in 1985. The artwork was commissioned by Apple COO of the time, Del Yocam. The sketch was part of Warhol's d series and came complete with his signature in the bottom right corner. In May 2009, the three-foot-square print was auctioned at the O'Gallerie in Portland for around $26,000. It's certainly an expensive print, but it's significantly less than the $100 million price tag the 1963 "Eight Elvises" painting sold for in October 2008.

Apple I Computer

The first Apple computer was designed by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in 1976. The computer motherboard originally sold for $666.66, but in June 2012 it was auctioned off at Sotheby's for $374,500. Approximately 200 Apple I computers were made, with an estimated 50 surviving today. Sotheby's reports claim only six are currently known to be in working condition.

Apple Founding Documents

The most expensive Apple product to ever sell is the set of original founding documents for Apple Computer Co. The documents were signed by three founders: Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak and Ron Wayne. Roughly two weeks after the documents were signed, Ron Wayne wanted out of the company in fear that creditors may go after him if the company was not profitable. Wayne's 10% stake today would have been worth billions today, but he claims that he does not regret his decision.

Sotheby's auction house estimated the documents would go for around $150,000. The documents ended up selling for about $1.6 million - the cost of around 3,056 Apple shares today.
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