5 Most Profitable Video Game Adaptations In Film


Most Profitable Video Game To Movie Adaptations

Video games are a source of inspiration for filmmakers. Several virtual worlds have been brought to life by Hollywood and turned into blockbuster hits. These action-packed, big screen odes to video games might not be critically acclaimed, but they all made their mark at the box office.

"Tomb Raider" Franchise

The Lara Croft character was named as the "most successful human video game heroine" by Guinness World Records in 2006. The character has appeared in 18 video games. The first Lara Croft film, "Lara Croft: Tomb Raider," was released in 2001. It stars Angelina Jolie as British archaeologist Croft who battled foes as she tried to retrieve ancient artifacts from all over the world. The movie made $274.7 million at the box office and cost $115 million to produce. A sequel to the film, "Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life," was released in 2003. Jolie again played the role of Croft, and this time she was on the quest for Pandora's Box. The movie cost an estimated $95 million to produce and had a gross of more than $156 million in worldwide box office receipts. Despite box office success, the movie was panned by critics. Movie rating site Rotten Tomatoes gave Tomb Raider a 19% review. "Cradle of Life" fared slightly better with a 24% rating.

"Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time"

The Prince of Persia video game was originally released in 1989 for the Apple II. The game was given new life by Ubisoft which created "The Sands of Time" trilogy. The film adaptation was released in 2010. It cost $200 million to produce and made $335 million at the box office. It stars Jake Gyllenhaal as fugitive Prince Dastan who embarks on a high-stakes adventure to save the world.

"Pokémon: The First Movie"

The Pokémon universe was created in 1990 by the Game Freak company under the name "Capsule Monsters." Nintendo signed on to market and publish the game which came out in 1996. "Pokémon: The First Movie: Mewtwo Strikes Back" hit theaters in 1998. The animated film tells the story of a group of scientists who try to clone the most powerful Pokémon, Mew. It doesn't end well for the scientists who are killed by their evil creation. The clone creature goes on to wreak havoc on the earth. The film grossed almost $86 million in the U.S. and cost $31 million to produce.

"Mortal Kombat"

Due to its violent content, the "Mortal Kombat" game series was controversial when it debuted as an arcade game in the early '90s. The game featured a cast of characters who fought each other and produced lots of blood and gory deaths as a result. The movie was released in 1995. It cost $18 million to produce and grossed more than $122 million worldwide. A sequel to the film was released in 1997. It wasn't as popular as the original and made only $51.3 million.

"Resident Evil" Franchise

The "Resident Evil" video game came out in 1996. A film followed in 2002. Even with an R rating, the $33-million film managed to bring in more than $102 million worldwide. The film diverts from the video games in many ways such as eliminating the main characters from the games and focusing on original storylines. Milla Jovovich is the star of the series and plays the character Alice. The 2004 sequel, "Resident Evil Apocalypse," made more than $129 million worldwide, and the third film in the series, "Resident Evil: Extinction," scored almost $148 million. The fifth "Resident Evil" film, "Resident Evil: Retribution," was released in 2012, and it grossed more than $200 million worldwide.
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