5 Reasons Why Companies Care About Their Stock Prices

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Typically, companies issue shares to the public and receive their money up front. Investors then either make profits or suffer losses depending on the performance of the stock. The original company that issues the stock does not participate in any profits or losses resulting from these transactions because this company has no vested monetary interest. This is what confuses many people. Why then does a company, or more specifically its management, care about a stock's performance in the secondary market when this company has already received its money in the IPO? Read on to find out.
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