Even though Barnes & Noble (NYSE:BKS) still sports a billion-dollar enterprise value, investors and analysts have hardly been bullish about its standalone prospects. Now it sounds as though its partner Microsoft (Nasdaq:MSFT) may be about to make a move that would significantly transform the company. While a deal for Nook Media would likely be a real positive for Barnes & Noble, I have a harder time seeing how Microsoft gets its money's worth with such a deal.

Just A Rumor … For Now
Barnes & Noble's Nook Media business (both the e-reader/tablet operations and digital media) has been the target of ample M&A speculation for quite some time, with Microsoft and Liberty Media (Nasdaq:LMCA) figuring prominently in the speculation. Now it sounds as though a real bid could be on the way.

TechCrunch reported that Microsoft is preparing a $1 billion bid for Nook Media – a business in which it owns a roughly 18% stake. As there has been no formal comment or confirmation from either Barnes & Noble or Microsoft, details are scarce. Presumably Microsoft would pay cash, but it's unclear what assets the company would be buying, particularly the chain of college bookstores.

A $1 billion valuation is higher than where most analysts are in their valuations of the Nook Media business. Amazon (Nasdaq:AMZN) and Apple (Nasdaq:AAPL) have effectively kept Nook from gaining any real traction, and Barnes & Noble has yet to establish that this is a viable business that can generate worthwhile economic profits over the long-term. To that end, it's worth pointing out that the value of Nook Media was about $1.7 billion when it was established in April of 2012 (with a $300 million investment from Microsoft) and about $1.8 billion in December of 2012 when Pearson (NYSE:PSO) invested about $90 million. Since then, though, Barnes & Noble saw a pretty unimpressive Christmas season and has been trying to move product through aggressive pricing.

SEE: Which Tablet Should You Buy?

A Business Still In Transition
I think it's also noteworthy that TechCrunch's report mentioned that new tablets from Nook Media would be discontinued by the end of fiscal 2014. It wasn't clear whether this decision was tied to the rumored Microsoft bid or not, but it would seem unlikely that Microsoft would have any particular need to continue their production (though keeping the Nook brand name could have some value).

As previously mentioned, it's not as though Barnes & Noble has gained real share with its tablet/e-reader products. Relative to Apple, Amazon, and Samsung, the Nook product line is effectively a non-factor. What's more, it's not as though it has demonstrably funneled a meaningful stream of proprietary business to the company's digital media operations. Getting rid of the hardware, then, could be an opportunity to do away with what is likely a loss-leader and focus instead on the “razor blade” model of digital content – though here, too, the business models are all still in flux.

Where's The Value To Microsoft?
I think Barnes & Noble would be happy to take Microsoft's $1 billion and move on from the Nook Media operations. What I'm not so sure of is what Microsoft would gain from this transaction.

Given Nook's share in the tablet market, the brand value doesn't seem to be worth that much. I'm also not sure why Microsoft would think it would unseat Amazon or Apple in digital media, even if it integrates it with other properties like Bing. After all, it's not like the company's ventures into digital entertainment have been breakaway successes, and that's after many, many years and widespread popularity of console gaming.

Along these lines, it would be a risky deal for Microsoft management. The money is almost trivial – Microsoft has tens of billions of dollars of cash on the balance sheet and generates tens of billions in free cash flow each year. What isn't trivial is how investors perceive management and the dissatisfaction that has grown with Microsoft's M&A practices, from the $6 billion write-down of aQuantive to the still very much unproven Skype purchase. Were Microsoft to do this deal, and do so without a very convincing rationale, it would likely just stoke the fires of resentment that are already warming the seats of the board of directors.

SEE: Microsoft Vs. Apple

The Bottom Line
Given how many rumors have swirled around Barnes & Noble over the past two years, investors should take any new rumor with a heavy pinch of salt. Though a billion-dollar bid for Nook Media would certainly be a win for the company (and push fair value well into the $20s, if not the $30s), this may be another idle rumor. Consequently, this is really only a catalyst for traders and speculators, not investors. For Microsoft, we'll see what happens. I can't see how this would really improve the company, and it could be a marginal negative for a stock that's already too cheap … in large part due to negative perceptions about management and their ability to generate real growth again.

At the time of writing, Stephen D. Simpson did not own shares in any of the companies mentioned in this article.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    A Primer On Investing In The Tech Industry

    The tech sector can provide fantastic returns for investors with a little know-how in the field.
  2. Professionals

    Microsoft Excel Features For The Financially Literate

    Here are some of Excel's functions and features that a financial professional can use to make his or her job more efficient.
  3. Taxes

    Tablets To 1040s: How Taxes Began

    Ever dream of a world without tax? It existed - 3,000 years ago.
  4. Personal Finance

    Microsoft: By The Numbers

    We take a look back at this company's past and present numbers to see what they can tell us about its future.
  5. Investing

    The Rise of Corporate Venture Capital

    After the success of Google Ventures, corporate venture capital is an increasingly popular diversification and hedging tool for many large corporations.
  6. Personal Finance

    A Day in the Life of an Equity Research Analyst

    What does an equity research analyst do on an everyday basis?
  7. Investing

    What’s Plaguing Twitter and Yelp?

    Yelp and Twitter have recently become grounded in reality and unable to justify their sky-high stock valuations.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: PowerShares S&P 500 Downside Hedged

    Find out about the PowerShares S&P 500 Downside Hedged ETF, and learn detailed information about characteristics, suitability and recommendations of it.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares Morningstar Small-Cap Value

    Find out about the Shares Morningstar Small-Cap Value ETF, and learn detailed information about this exchange-traded fund that focuses on small-cap equities.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: ProShares Large Cap Core Plus

    Learn information about the ProShares Large Cap Core Plus ETF, and explore detailed analysis of its characteristics, suitability and recommendations.
RELATED TERMS
  1. Equity

    The value of an asset less the value of all liabilities on that ...
  2. Profit Margin

    A category of ratios measuring profitability calculated as net ...
  3. Quarter - Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4

    A three-month period on a financial calendar that acts as a basis ...
  4. Debt Ratio

    A financial ratio that measures the extent of a company’s or ...
  5. Price-Earnings Ratio - P/E Ratio

    The Price-to-Earnings Ratio or P/E ratio is a ratio for valuing ...
  6. Net Present Value - NPV

    The difference between the present values of cash inflows and ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the formula for calculating compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in Excel?

    The compound annual growth rate, or CAGR for short, measures the return on an investment over a certain period of time. Below ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why would a corporation issue convertible bonds?

    A convertible bond represents a hybrid security that has bond and equity features; this type of bond allows the conversion ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between the return on total assets and an interest rate?

    Return on total assets (ROTA) represents one of the profitability metrics. It is calculated by taking a company's earnings ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does additional paid in capital affect retained earnings?

    Both additional paid-in capital and retained earnings are entries under the shareholders' equity section of a company's balance ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

COMPANIES IN THIS ARTICLE
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!