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Tickers in this Article: IACI, NFLX, CSTR, GE, NWS, DIS, BBI, TWC, CMCSA
If the decision to leave cable behind ever moves from a trickle to a rush, investors should take notice of internet brand owners and content providers like Barry Diller's IAC/InterActiveCorp (Nasdaq:IACI). Let's take a look at how the Internet operating company and other content distributors are positioned to capture cable-programming dissenters. IN PICTURES: Eight Ways To Survive A Market Downturn

Pick a Brand
Just pick an internet brand, and it won't be long before you mention one of the many that falls under the IAC umbrella. There's evite.com for your event planning needs, match.com for your dating needs, citysearch.com for your what's going on in this city needs and ask.com for your general internet search needs.

IAC's Earnings
IAC's first quarter 2009 revenues were down 10% from the same period a year ago, mainly tied to declines in its media and advertising segment including ask.com and citysearch. Investors, however, should also note that IAC is currently trading below its book value in the $18 price range, and that there have been several insider transactions to acquire its stock from March through June of this year.

TV Workarounds
The television and movie watching set who are still interested in passive entertainment have the ability to order shows from Netflix.com (Nasdaq:NFLX), pick up a $1 movie at a nearby RedBox (Nasdaq:CSTR) DVD kiosk or tune into a variety of free television programming available at hulu.com, a joint venture of NBC Universal (NYSE:GE), Fox Entertainment Group (NYSE:NWS) and Walt Disney's (NYSE:DIS) ABC Inc. Television programming fans also have the option to rent movies and entire TV series from the still frequently busy on the weekends BlockBuster (NYSE:BBI) video chain stores.

Cable's Grip
Cable television operators like Time Warner Cable (NYSE:TWC) and Comcast (Nasdaq:CMCSA) are not out of the picture since they still have the majority of television viewers and their growing libraries of movie demands and the variety of popular programming offered exceeds what's available online, but as investors, we must look forward and pay attention to where the next generation will go for their media content and leisure entertainment.

The Bottom Line
Products and services will be made available, and they must have marketing in order to be sold. If TV and print are the old forms of reaching customers, the companies who can master delivering content tied to clever and consistent marketing campaigns across multiple media outlets are assets investors those interested in media will want to research and invest in. (For further reading, check out From The Printing Press To The Internet.)

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