The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) was launched by Charles Dow way back in 1896, making it one of the oldest stock indexes. At the time, it was simply an average of the stock market's top 12 stocks.
Since then, the calculating the Dow has gotten a little more complicated, although it has lost its cachet as the premier benchmark of the stock market; that title now belongs to the S&P 500. However, it isn't time to forget the Dow altogether: the most blue chip stocks of the U.S. stock market belong to this index, making it a great choice for risk-averse investors who are looking for an index-tracking ETF. (For related reading, please see Index Investing: The Dow Jones Industrial Average.)

IN PICTURES: World's Greatest Investors

Unfortunately, the Dow 30 as a whole has a low dividend yield (only around 2.5%). Therefore, if you are an income investor who is counting on a reliable stream of dividend payments, the Dow 30's low yield might make it less attractive as a core holding.

However, if you sift through the index's 30 component stocks, you will notice that a number of them are high-yielding, consistent dividend payers. The index also includes a number of blue chips with solid dividend yields.

For all of you dividend fiends out there, we combed through the Dow 30 to find some of the best yielding stocks:

Company Current Dividend Yield Market Cap (Billions)
VERIZON COMM (NYSE:VZ) 5.98% 92.12
T) 5.87% 169.00
PFIZER (NYSE:PFE) 4.19% 138.02
(NYSE:MRK) 4.13% 113.14
KRAFT (NYSE:KFT) 3.76% 53.82

The Bottom Line
Dividends matter. After all, a dividend check can help investors sleep easily, knowing they own a piece of a stable company with the ability to make money. Best of all, dividends are cash-in-hand, leaving investors with the favorable choice on how to spend or invest them. (To learn more about how dividends can boost your portfolio, see How Dividends Work For Investors.)

Use the Investopedia Stock Simulator to trade the stocks mentioned in this stock analysis, risk free!

Related Articles
  1. Stock Analysis

    How Toyota Succeeds at Home and Abroad (TM)

    Japan's biggest car manufacturer is also one of North America's biggest, delighting shareholders with its high profit margins.
  2. Stock Analysis

    Starbucks: Profiting One Cup at a Time (SBUX)

    Starbucks is everywhere. But is it a worthwhile business? Ask the shareholders who've made it one of the world's most successful companies.
  3. Stock Analysis

    How Medtronic Makes Money (MDT)

    Here's the story of an American medical device firm that covers almost every segment in medicine and recently moved to Ireland to pay less in taxes.
  4. Investing News

    Latest Labor Numbers: Good News for the Market?

    Some economic numbers are indicating that the labor market is outperforming the stock market. Should investors be bullish?
  5. Investing News

    Stocks with Big Dividend Yields: 'It's a Trap!'

    Should you seek high yielding-dividend stocks in the current investment environment?
  6. Investing News

    Should You Be Betting with Buffett Right Now?

    Following Warren Buffett's stock picks has historically been a good strategy. Is considering his biggest holdings in 2016 a good idea?
  7. Products and Investments

    Cash vs. Stocks: How to Decide Which is Best

    Is it better to keep your money in cash or is a down market a good time to buy stocks at a lower cost?
  8. Investing News

    Who Does Cheap Oil Benefit? See This Stock (DG)

    Cheap oil won't benefit most companies, but this retailer might buck that trend.
  9. Investing

    How to Ballast a Portfolio with Bonds

    If January and early February performance is any guide, there’s a new normal in financial markets today: Heightened volatility.
  10. Stock Analysis

    Performance Review: Emerging Markets Equities in 2015

    Find out why emerging markets struggled in 2015 and why a half-decade long trend of poor returns is proving optimistic growth investors wrong.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do dividends affect retained earnings?

    When a company issues a cash dividend to its shareholders, the retained earnings listed on the balance sheet are reduced ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why would a corporation issue convertible bonds?

    A convertible bond represents a hybrid security that has bond and equity features; this type of bond allows the conversion ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does additional paid in capital affect retained earnings?

    Both additional paid-in capital and retained earnings are entries under the shareholders' equity section of a company's balance ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What types of capital are not considered share capital?

    The money a business uses to fund operations or growth is called capital, and there are a number of capital sources available. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between issued share capital and subscribed share capital?

    The difference between subscribed share capital and issued share capital is the former relates to the amount of stock for ... Read Full Answer >>
COMPANIES IN THIS ARTICLE
Trading Center