The stock market has new winners - and losers - every day. In some cases, losing companies are suffering from company-specific events, and these are being factored into the stocks' prices by the market. But this is not always the case; sometimes losing stocks are just being brought down by peers that are experiencing problems or feeling the pain of a poor economic outlook. As a result, some losing stocks are ripe for appreciation.

If you look at stocks that have hit 52-week lows, deciding which ones have potential requires an investigation of the economy, the company's industry and any company-specific issues. That said, any stock that hits a fresh 52-week low or one that is below 50% of its 52-week high is worth an initial look. Here we check out six stocks that are hitting rock bottom.

IN PICTURES: 8 Ways To Survive A Market Downturn

Company Industry Market Cap 52-Week Range Current Price
Toyota Motor Corp. (NYSE:TM) Auto Manufacturer 104.11B $61.00-$93.90 $60.39
Royal Bank of Canada (NYSE:RY) Banking 60.09B $41.79-$62.20 $41.78
Walgreen Co. (NYSE:WAG) Drug Stores 28.54B $30.63-$46.33 $32.09
Credit Suisse Group (NYSE:CS) Banking 25.66B $21.71-$46.17 $21.25
Thomson Reuters (NYSE:TRI) Technology 21.56B $25.84-$40.66 $26.06
Panasonic Corporation (NYSE:PC) Electronic Equipment 20.73B $8.47-$14.66 $8.45

Conclusion
These stocks are hitting lows in their 52-week trading ranges. In some cases, this can mean big potential for investors, but it's up to you to analyze these companies' financials and decide whether they are ripe for appreciation or just falling knives. A fresh 52-week low is a good signal to screen potential investments, but it should not be the data on which investment decisions are based. (Value investing may seem fool-proof, but it carries more risk than you might know. To learn more, check out Buy High, Sell Much Higher.)

Use the Investopedia Stock Simulator to trade the stocks mentioned in this stock analysis, risk free!

Related Articles
  1. Stock Analysis

    Why the Bullish Are Turning Bearish

    Banks are reducing their targets for the S&P 500 for 2016. Here's why.
  2. Stock Analysis

    How to Find Quality Stocks Amid the Wreckage

    Finding companies with good earnings and hitting on all cylinders in this environment, although possible, is not easy.
  3. Investing News

    What You Can Learn from Carl Icahn's Mistakes

    Carl Icahn has been a stellar performer in the investment world for decades, but following his lead these days could be dangerous.
  4. Stock Analysis

    Analyzing Altria's Return on Equity (ROE) (MO)

    Learn about Altria Group's return on equity (ROE) and analyze net profit margin, asset turnover and financial leverage to determine what is causing its high ROE.
  5. Investing News

    Icahn's Bet on Cheniere Energy: Should You Follow?

    Investing legend Carl Icahn continues to lose money on Cheniere Energy, but he's increasing his stake. Should you follow his lead?
  6. Stock Analysis

    Analyzing Google's Return on Equity (ROE) (GOOGL)

    Learn about Alphabet's return on equity. How has its ROE changed over time, how does it compare to its peers and what factors are driving ROE for the company?
  7. Investing News

    Is Buffett's Bet on Oil Right for You? (XOM, PSX)

    Oil stocks are getting trounced, but Warren Buffett still likes one of them. Should you follow the leader?
  8. Investing News

    Chipotle Served with Criminal Probe

    Chipotle's beat muted expectations and got a clear bill from the CDC, but it now appears that an investigation into its E.coli breakout has expanded.
  9. Stock Analysis

    Analyzing Sprint Corp's Return on Equity (ROE) (S)

    Learn about Sprint's return on equity. Find out why its ROE is negative and how asset turnover and financial leverage impact ROE relative to Sprint's peers.
  10. Stock Analysis

    Why Alphabet is the Best of the 'FANGs' for 2016

    Alphabet just impressed the street, but is it the best FANG stock?
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do dividends affect retained earnings?

    When a company issues a cash dividend to its shareholders, the retained earnings listed on the balance sheet are reduced ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why would a corporation issue convertible bonds?

    A convertible bond represents a hybrid security that has bond and equity features; this type of bond allows the conversion ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does additional paid in capital affect retained earnings?

    Both additional paid-in capital and retained earnings are entries under the shareholders' equity section of a company's balance ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What types of capital are not considered share capital?

    The money a business uses to fund operations or growth is called capital, and there are a number of capital sources available. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between issued share capital and subscribed share capital?

    The difference between subscribed share capital and issued share capital is the former relates to the amount of stock for ... Read Full Answer >>
COMPANIES IN THIS ARTICLE
Trading Center