The absolute price of a stock has very little to do with the value that an investor receives, and yet there seems to be some kind of aura that surrounds stocks that are priced at extremely high prices, particularly those selling for more than $100.

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Part of this may stem from the existence of Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE:BRK.A, BRK.B) and the success that the stock has enjoyed over the past generation, making millionaires out of its early investors.

In reality, there is nothing special about stocks selling at this level, because at the end of the day, what matters is what the value is per share, compared to what you are paying per share - the relative movement between buying and selling.

Expensive Stocks
There are dozens of stocks currently trading at higher than $100 per share, some of them household names and others relatively unknown.

Seaboard Corp (NYSE:SEB) sells for $2,191 per share. The company is a conglomerate that is involved in many different businesses. These include food processing, power generation, containerized shipping, commodity trading and sugar and citrus production. (Huge companies may not be as infallible as previously assumed. (Find out why bigger isn't always better. Read Conglomerates: Cash Cows Or Corporate Chaos?)

NVR (NYSE:NVR) trades in the mid-$760 range per share. NVR is a homebuilder, doing business under the Ryan Homes brand name. Despite a 10.69% return already this year, the company suffered as much as its peers during the recession and financial crisis, hitting a low of $313 per share back in March, 2009.

Google (Nasdaq:GOOG) of course needs no introduction, as it is one of the go-to stocks of the 21st century. Google sells near $600 per share.

There is more to the Washington Post (NYSE:WPO) than the famed namesake newspaper published in the nation's capital. The company also owns Newsweek magazine and several other newspaper properties, cable assets and TV broadcast stations. Shares trade at $425.

Wesco Financial (NYSE:WSC) does some insurance business, and also owns a furniture rental business along with a steel segment. The company is majority owned by a subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway. Shares currently trade at $390.

One company that sought out the fame of triple digit pricing is Biglari Holdings (NYSE:BH), which closed at $402.

The Bottom Line
Psychology is an important part of the investment process, and stocks selling at triple digits and higher seem to have panache that attracts certain types of investors. Although this can't be explained by any legitimate reason, it is still a part of the market that investors must deal with. (Investing in a corporate giant may not be as safe as you think. To learn more, check out Conglomerates: Risky Proposition?) Use the Investopedia Stock Simulator to trade the stocks mentioned in this stock analysis, risk free!

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