The Securities Act of 1933 was the first major piece of securities industry regulation that was brought about largely as a result of the stock market crash of 1929. Other major laws were also enacted to help prevent another meltdown of the nation’s financial system such as the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, but we will start our review with the Securities Act of 1933 as it regulates the issuance of corporate securities.

The Securities Act of 1933 was the first major piece of securities industry legislation and it regulates the primary market. The primary market consists exclusively of transactions between issuers of securities and investors. In a primary market transaction, the issuer of the securities receives the proceeds from the sale of the securities. The Securities Act of 1933 requires non-exempt issuers (typically corporate issuers) to file a registration statement with the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC). The Registration statement will be under review by the SEC for a minimum of 20 days. During this time, known as the “cooling off” period, no sales of securities may take place. If the SEC requires additional information regarding the offering, the SEC may issue a deficiency letter or a stop order that will extend the cooling off period beyond the original 20 days. The cooling off period will continue until the SEC has received all of the information it had requested. The registration statement that is formally known as an “S1” is the issuer’s full disclosure document for the registration of the securities with the SEC.

The Prospectus

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