Money market instruments are highly liquid, fixed-income securities issued by govern- ments and corporations with high credit ratings. Because of the high quality of the issuers and because of the short-term maturities, money market instruments are considered very safe.

Corporate Money Market Instruments

Both corporations and banks sell money market instruments to obtain short term financing. These money market instruments issued will include:

  • Banker’s acceptances
  • Negotiable certificates of deposit
  • Commercial paper
  • Federal funds loans
  • Repurchase agreements
  • Reverse repurchase agreements

Banker’s Acceptances

Corporations, in order to facilitate foreign trade, import/export, use banker’s acceptances. The banker’s acceptance acts like a line of credit or a post-dated check. The BA (Banker’s Acceptance) is a time draft that will be cleared by the issuing bank on the day it comes due to whomever presents it for payment. The maturity dates on BA’s range from as little as one day to a maximum of 270 days (9 months).

Negotiable Certificates of Deposit

A negotiable CD is a time deposit with a fixed interest rate and a set maturity ranging from 30 days to 10 years or more. A negotiable CD, unlike the traditional CD, may be exchanged or traded between investors. The minimum denomination for a negotiable CD is $100,000. Many negotiable CD’S are issued in denominations exceeding $1,000,000 but FDIC only insures the first $250,000. Negotiable CDs trade will accrued interest.

Commercial Paper

The largest and most creditworthy corporations use commercial paper as a way to obtain short-term funds. Commercial paper is an unsecured promissory note or an IOU issued by the corporation. Corporations will sell commercial paper to finance such things as short- term working capital or to meet their cash needs due to seasonal business cycles. Commercial paper maturities range from one day to a maximum of 270 days. It is issued at a discount to its face value and has an interest rate that is below what a commercial bank would typically charge for the funds. Commercial paper is typically issued in book entry form. There are two types of commercial paper: direct paper and dealer paper. With direct paper, the issuer sells it directly to the public without the use of a dealer. Dealer paper is sold to dealers who then resell the paper to investors.

Federal Fund Loans

Federal fund loans are loans between two large banks that are typically made for short periods of time in amounts of $1,000,000 or more. These loans may be exchanged in the money market between investors.

Repurchase Agreements

A repurchase agreement is a fully collateralized loan made between a dealer and a large institutional investor. These loans are usually collateralized with US Government securities that have been sold to the lender. The borrower (Seller) agrees to repurchase the securities from the lender at a slightly higher price. The slightly higher price represents the lender’s interest.

Reverse Repurchase Agreement

In a reverse repurchase agreement, the institutional investor initiates the transaction by selling the securities to the dealer and agrees to repurchase them at a later time. In a reverse repurchase agreement the borrower (seller) is the institution, not the dealer.

Fixed Vs. Open Repurchase Agreements

With a fixed repurchase agreement, the borrower (seller) agrees to repurchase the securities at a fixed price on a specified date. With an open repurchase agreement, the date of the repurchase is not fixed and the open repurchase agreement becomes a demand note for the lender and may be called in.

Note:

Corporate issues with less than one year to maturity, regardless of the original maturity, may be traded in the money market.

Other Money Market Instruments

Related Articles
  1. Investing

    Introduction To Commercial Paper

    Commercial paper is a short-term instrument that can be a viable alternative for retail fixed-income investors looking for a better rate of return on their money.
  2. Investing

    The Money Market

    The money market provides a relatively stable place to park capital that may be needed within a short time horizon.
  3. Investing

    Repurchase Agreement

    A repurchase agreement is the equivalent of a short-term collateralized loan. An owner of marketable securities sells those securities to a buyer for cash. As part of the deal, the seller agrees ...
  4. Investing

    Behind U.S. Equities' Declining Buybacks and Dividend Payments

    Learn what a decline in share repurchases and dividend payouts by corporations means for equity markets, and whether it is a cause for long-term concern.
  5. Personal Finance

    Banker's Acceptance 101

    A banker's acceptance, a common way of financing international trade activity, provides a relatively safe, short-term vehicle for investors. An acceptance is a negotiable time draft that a bank ...
  6. Investing

    What Does a Dealer Do?

    Dealers possess certain qualities that distinguish them from brokers and traders.
  7. Investing

    Are CDs Good Protection For The Bear Market?

    Certificates of deposit promise stable income in any market, but do they deliver?
Frequently Asked Questions
  1. How did the ABX index behave during the 2008 subprime mortgage crisis?

    Read about the disastrous performance of the various ABX indexes in the subprime mortgage crisis of 2008 during the middle ...
  2. How did moral hazard contribute to the 2008 financial crisis?

    Learn about moral hazard, how it can affect outcomes and how it contributed to the conditions that led to the 2008 financial ...
  3. Which mutual funds made money in 2008?

    Read about the only mutual fund that turned a profit in 2008. Learn about risk-averse investment strategies and the financial ...
  4. Were Collateralized Debt Obligations (CDO) Responsible for the 2008 Financial Crisis?

    Collateralized debt obligations are exotic financial instruments that can be difficult to understand, Learn the role they ...
Trading Center