10-Year Treasury Note

What is a '10-Year Treasury Note'

A 10-year treasury note is a debt obligation issued by the United States government that matures in 10 years. A 10-year Treasury note pays interest at a fixed rate once every six months and pays the face value to the holder at maturity. An advantage of investing in 10-year Treasury notes, and other federal government securities, is that the interest payments are exempt from state and local income tax. However, they are still taxable at the federal level.

BREAKING DOWN '10-Year Treasury Note'

The U.S. Treasury also sells notes with two, three, five and seven-year terms. All of these notes, along with Treasury bills and bonds, can be purchased directly from the U.S. government through the TreasuryDirect website via competitive or noncompetitive bidding with a minimum purchase of $100 and in $100 increments. They can also be purchased indirectly through a bank or broker. Investors can choose to hold Treasury notes until maturity or sell early. There is no minimum ownership term.

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