100% Equities Strategy

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DEFINITION of '100% Equities Strategy'

An investment strategy for an individual portfolio or pooled funds vehicle such as a mutual fund. Only equity securities are considered for investment, whether they be listed stocks, over-the-counter stocks, or private equity shares. A mutual fund or ETF will often state a "100% equities strategy" in its prospectus to inform potential investors of the fund's overall risk profile.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS '100% Equities Strategy'

Equities are generally considered the riskier asset class over both bonds and cash, but historical returns have been higher as well. A well diversified portfolio of all stocks can protect against individual company risk or even sector risk, but market risks will still exist that can affect the equities asset class. All-stock portfolios will perform best when the underlying economy is growing (as measured by GDP) and inflation is low to moderate, as inflation diminishes the future cash flows of equities.


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