SEC Form 10-Q

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DEFINITION of 'SEC Form 10-Q'

A comprehensive report of a company's performance that must be submitted quarterly by all public companies to the Securities and Exchange Commission. In the 10-Q, firms are required to disclose relevant information regarding their financial position. The form must be submitted on time, and the information should be available to all interested parties.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'SEC Form 10-Q'

The 10-Q is due 35 days (it used to be 45 days) after each of the first three fiscal quarters. There is no filing after the fourth quarter because that is when the 10-K is filed.

10-K = Yearly
10-Q = Quarterly

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