48-Hour Rule

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DEFINITION of '48-Hour Rule '

A requirement that all pooled information regarding to-be-announced transactions on forward mortgage-backed securities (MBS) be communicated to the buyer from the seller before 3 p.m. EST 48 hours prior to the settlement date of the trade. The 48-hour rule is a requirement under the Securities Industry And Financial Markets Association (SIFMA), which is formerly known as the Public Securities Association (PSA) or Bond Market Association.




INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS '48-Hour Rule '

Assume that the agreed upon settlement date between the buyer and the seller is July 14. The 48-hour rule requires that on July 12 by 3 p.m. EST the seller will have informed the buyer of the exact details of the MBS pooled that will be delivered on July 14. Also known as 48-hour day.










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