52-Week Range

AAA

DEFINITION of '52-Week Range'

The lowest and highest prices at which a stock has traded in the previous 52 weeks. The 52-week range is provided in a stock's quote summary along with information such as today's change and year-to-date change. Companies that have been trading for less than a year will still show a 52-week range even though there isn't data for the full range.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS '52-Week Range'

Technical analysts compare a stock's current trading price to its 52-week range to get a broad sense of how the stock is doing, as well as how much the stock's price has fluctuated. This information may indicate the potential future range of the stock and how volatile the shares are.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Closing Range

    The band of prices that a security trades at in a specified period, ...
  2. High-Low Index

    An index that seeks to provide confirmation of a market trend ...
  3. Technical Analysis

    A method of evaluating securities by analyzing statistics generated ...
  4. Trading Range

    The spread between the high and low prices traded during a period ...
  5. 52-Week High/Low

    The highest and lowest prices that a stock has traded at during ...
  6. Record High

    The highest historical price level reached by a security, commodity ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the "percentage off the 52-week high or low"? How is this calculated?

    The "percentage off the 52-week high or low" refers to when a security's current price is relative to where it has traded ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    The Five Biggest Stock Market Myths

    Stocks that go down must come up, right? Wrong. We bust this myth and four other common market misconceptions.
  2. Active Trading

    What Is Market Efficiency?

    The efficient market hypothesis (EMH) suggests that stock prices fully reflect all available information in the market. Is this possible?
  3. Investing Basics

    What Are A Stock's "Fundamentals"?

    The investing world loves to talk about fundamentals, but do you know what it means?
  4. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Using Volume Rate Of Change To Confirm Trends

    Wise traders rely on indicators that show a trend in volume, because without supportive volume, a price movement has no conviction.
  5. Budgeting

    The P/E Ratio: A Good Market-Timing Indicator

    Check out the returns this newer technical analysis tool would've yielded over the period from 1920 to 2003.
  6. Options & Futures

    Volatility Index Uncovers Market Bottoms

    VIX can gauge when the market has hit bottom - a welcome sign of better things to come.
  7. Trading Strategies

    Know How To Manage Gaps On Your Trading Strategy

    Gaps generate profitable strategies right after they print, as well as during retracements that test those levels, often months or years later.
  8. Charts & Patterns

    Why These Are 2015's Most-Promising Bank Stocks

    Which bank stocks should offer the best bang for your buck in 2015? Possibly these, so read on.
  9. Chart Advisor

    Trade Healthcare Providers with this ETF

    In good times and bad times one of the best sectors for retail investors to look into is the healthcare providers. Here's an ETF to consider.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Is Apple's Stock Over Valued Or Undervalued?

    Despite several drawbacks, the CAPM gives an overview of the level of return that investors should expect for bearing only systematic risk. Applying Apple, we get annual expected return of about ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Subsidy

    A benefit given by the government to groups or individuals usually in the form of a cash payment or tax reduction. The subsidy ...
  2. Sunk Cost

    A cost that has already been incurred and thus cannot be recovered. A sunk cost differs from other, future costs that a business ...
  3. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  4. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  5. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
  6. Cost Accounting

    A type of accounting process that aims to capture a company's costs of production by assessing the input costs of each step ...
Trading Center