52-Week High/Low


DEFINITION of '52-Week High/Low'

The highest and lowest prices that a stock has traded at during the previous year. Many traders and investors view the 52-week high or low as an important factor in determining a stock's current value and predicting future price movement.

BREAKING DOWN '52-Week High/Low'

As a stock trades within its 52-week price range (the range that exists between the 52-week low and the 52-week high), investors may show increased interest as price nears either the high or the low. A popular strategy used by stock traders is to buy when price exceeds its 52-week high, or to sell when price falls below its 52-week low. The rationale behind this strategy is that if price breaks out from the 52-week range (either above or below) there will be enough momentum to continue the price move in a favorable direction.

Alternatively, another strategy is to sell when price reaches its 52-week high on the assumption that price will recede, or to buy when price reaches its 52-week low in anticipation of a value play. Traders and investors typically conduct additional technical and/or fundamental analysis for confirmation.

  1. High-Low Index

    An index that seeks to provide confirmation of a market trend ...
  2. Breadth Indicator

    A mathematical formula that uses advancing and declining issues ...
  3. Value Stock

    A stock that tends to trade at a lower price relative to it's ...
  4. Advance/Decline Line - A/D

    A technical indicator that plots changes in the value of the ...
  5. Technical Analysis

    A method of evaluating securities by analyzing statistics generated ...
  6. Value Investing

    The strategy of selecting stocks that trade for less than their ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Stock Basics Tutorial

    If you're new to the stock market and want the basics, this is the tutorial for you!
  2. Investing Basics

    The Five Biggest Stock Market Myths

    Stocks that go down must come up, right? Wrong. We bust this myth and four other common market misconceptions.
  3. Investing Basics

    5 Common Misconceptions About Dividends

    Here are five common misconceptions about dividends that are important to know.
  4. Term

    What's a Sector?

    The term sector has several applications in economics and finance.
  5. Term

    What's a Return of Capital?

    A return of capital is an investment return that is not considered income.
  6. Stock Analysis

    The Biggest Risks of Investing in Netflix Stock

    Examine the current state of Netflix Inc., and learn about three of the major fundamental risks that the company is currently facing.
  7. Stock Analysis

    Investing in Lumber Liquidators? Read This First

    Find out what investors should know before buying Lumber Liquidators shares. Learn about Lumber Liquidators' financial performance and operational outlook.
  8. Stock Analysis

    What Seagate Gains by Acquiring Dot Hill Systems

    Examine the Seagate acquisition of Dot Hill Systems, and learn what Seagate is looking to gain by acquiring Dot Hill's software technology.
  9. Investing Basics

    3 Key Signs Of A Market Top

    When stocks rise or fall, the financial fate of investors change, as well. There are certain signs that can reveal a stock’s course, and investors don’t need to be experts to spot them.
  10. Investing

    How to Win More by Losing Less in Today’s Markets

    The further you fall, the harder it is to climb back up. It’s a universal truth that is painfully apparent in the investing world.
  1. How can I use market breadth to my advantage?

    Market breadth is a study that compares the number of companies on a given exchange that have created new 52-week highs to ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can working capital be too high?

    A company's working capital ratio can be too high in the sense that an excessively high ratio is generally considered an ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do I use discounted cash flow (DCF) to value stock?

    Discounted cash flow (DCF) analysis can be a very helpful tool for analysts and investors in equity valuation. It provides ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Where do penny stocks trade?

    Generally, penny stocks are traded through the use of the Over the Counter Bulletin Board (OTCBB) and through pink sheets. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Where can I buy penny stocks?

    Some penny stocks, those using the definition of trading for less than $5 per share, are traded on regular exchanges such ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does the stock market react to changes in the Federal Funds Rate?

    The stock market reacts to changes in the federal funds rate in various ways depending on where it is in the business cycle. ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Purchasing Power

    The value of a currency expressed in terms of the amount of goods or services that one unit of money can buy. Purchasing ...
  2. Real Estate Investment Trust - REIT

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through property or mortgages and often trades on major exchanges ...
  3. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  4. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
  5. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  6. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!