60-Plus Delinquencies

Definition of '60-Plus Delinquencies'


Home loans that are more than 60 days past due on their monthly mortgage payments. 60-plus delinquency rates are typically expressed as a percentage of a group of loans written within a specified time period, such as a given calendar year. Another common grouping method are the interest rates for the pool of loans that make up a mortgage-backed security (MBS) or other securitized mortgage product.

60-plus delinquencies are less than 90 days past due, and have not yet entered the foreclosure process - loan in the latter status are expressed separately. The 60-plus rate may be split into one for prime loans and subprime loans. The 60-plus rate on subprime loans can be expected to be higher than for prime. Also, 60-plus rates are often published separately for fixed-rate versus adjustable-rate loans.

Investopedia explains '60-Plus Delinquencies'


The 60-plus rate is often added to another negative event measure, the foreclosure rate for the same group of loans. The two added together give a cumulative measure of the individual mortgages that are either not being paid at all, or being paid behind schedule.

If the rate on past-due and/or foreclosed mortgages rises beyond a certain level, the mortgage-backed security may have a shortfall of cash to pay out to investors. This can cause massive re-pricing of assets, resulting in some investors losing the majority of their invested capital.



comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Passive ETF

    One of two types of exchange-traded funds (ETFs) available for investors. Passive ETFs are index funds that track a specific benchmark, such as a SPDR. Unlike actively managed ETFs, passive ETFs are not managed by a fund manager on a daily basis.
  2. Walras' Law

    An economics law that suggests that the existence of excess supply in one market must be matched by excess demand in another market so that it balances out. So when examining a specific market, if all other markets are in equilibrium, Walras' Law asserts that the examined market is also in equilibrium.
  3. Market Segmentation

    A marketing term referring to the aggregating of prospective buyers into groups (segments) that have common needs and will respond similarly to a marketing action. Market segmentation enables companies to target different categories of consumers who perceive the full value of certain products and services differently from one another.
  4. Effective Annual Interest Rate

    An investment's annual rate of interest when compounding occurs more often than once a year. Calculated as the following:
  5. Debit Spread

    Two options with different market prices that an investor trades on the same underlying security. The higher priced option is purchased and the lower premium option is sold - both at the same time. The higher the debit spread, the greater the initial cash outflow the investor will incur on the transaction.
  6. Odious Debt

    Money borrowed by one country from another country and then misappropriated by national rulers. A nation's debt becomes odious debt when government leaders use borrowed funds in ways that don't benefit or even oppress citizens. Some legal scholars argue that successor governments should not be held accountable for odious debt incurred by earlier regimes, but there is no consensus on how odious debt should actually be treated.
Trading Center