8-K

AAA

DEFINITION of '8-K'

A report of unscheduled material events or corporate changes at a company that could be of importance to the shareholders or the Securities and Exchange Commission.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS '8-K'

Examples of events reported on an 8-K include acquisition, bankruptcy, resignation of directors, or a change in the fiscal year. Also known as Form 8k.

RELATED TERMS
  1. SEC Form 6-K

    A form administrated by the Securities and Exchange Commission ...
  2. SEC Form S-4EF

    An SEC filing that is required when forming a savings bank, savings ...
  3. 10-K

    A comprehensive summary report of a company's performance that ...
  4. Form S-4

    A form that must be submitted to the Securities and Exchange ...
  5. SEC Form S-4

    A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) by ...
  6. SEC Form 10-Q

    A comprehensive report of a company's performance that must be ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What can cause a merger or acquisition deal to fail?

    When two large companies announce plans to merge, or when the larger of the two acquires the smaller entity, the surviving ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What happens when a corporation declares bankruptcy?

    When a corporation faces severe financial challenges that cause its inability to repay debt obligations, filing for protection ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What happens to a company's stocks and bonds when it declares chapter 11 bankruptcy ...

    Filing for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection simply means that a company is on the verge of bankruptcy, but believes that ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What was Robert Citron's role in Orange County, California's bankruptcy?

    In 1994, Orange County announced that its investment pool had lost $1.6 billion. The announcement from the Southern California ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What happens if I own a stock that is purchased by another company after filing for ...

    In declaring bankruptcy, a company is basically telling the market that it owes more money than it is worth. If the company ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Does a shareholder lose all of their equity once a Chapter 11 bankruptcy is filed ...

    When a company files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, the management of the company is still in charge of the daily operations. ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    SEC Filings: Forms You Need To Know

    The forms companies are required to file provide a clear view of their histories and progress.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    What Are Corporate Actions?

    Be a savvy investor - learn how corporate actions affect you as a shareholder.
  3. Options & Futures

    Evaluating Executive Compensation

    Find out how to determine whether a CEO is being overpaid.
  4. Bonds & Fixed Income

    An Overview Of Corporate Bankruptcy

    If a company files for bankruptcy, stockholders have the most to lose. Find out why.
  5. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  6. Options & Futures

    The Basics Of Mergers And Acquisitions

    Learn what corporate restructuring is, why companies do it and why it sometimes doesn't work.
  7. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Taking Advantage Of Corporate Decline

    A bankrupt company can provide great opportunities for savvy investors.
  8. Economics

    Understanding Subordinated Debt

    A loan or security that ranks below other loans or securities with regard to claims on assets or earnings.
  9. Stock Analysis

    Will American Airlines Fall Back To Earth In 2015?

    The airline industry enjoys blockbuster profits, and American Airlines Group has been a key beneficiary of the favorable trends that have lifted stocks.
  10. Investing

    What is Equity Financing?

    Companies that are short on cash may need financing to pay for short-term needs or long-term capital expenditures.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  2. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  3. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  4. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
  5. Adverse Selection

    1. The tendency of those in dangerous jobs or high risk lifestyles to get life insurance. 2. A situation where sellers have ...
Trading Center