8-K

DEFINITION of '8-K'

A report of unscheduled material events or corporate changes at a company that could be of importance to the shareholders or the Securities and Exchange Commission.

BREAKING DOWN '8-K'

Examples of events reported on an 8-K include acquisition, bankruptcy, resignation of directors, or a change in the fiscal year. Also known as Form 8k.

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