11th District Cost of Funds Index - COFI

DEFINITION of '11th District Cost of Funds Index - COFI'

A monthly weighted average of the interest rates paid on checking and savings accounts offered by financial institutions operating in the states of Arizona, California and Nevada. Published on the last day of each month, the COFI represents the cost of funds for western American financial institutions.

BREAKING DOWN '11th District Cost of Funds Index - COFI'

The COFI is computed using several different factors, with interest paid on savings accounts comprising the largest weighting in the average. Because of this, the index tends to exhibit low volatility and follow market interest rate changes somewhat slowly; it is generally regarded as a two-month lagging indicator of market interest rates.

Because it is computed using data from three western states, the COFI is primarily used in the western U.S. while the Treasury Index is the measure of choice in the east.

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