A/A2

AAA

DEFINITION of 'A/A2'

Usually the second- or third-highest rating that a rating agency assigns to a security or carrier. This rating signifies that there is a relatively low risk of default because the issuer or carrier is fairly stable. Investors and policyholders are therefore taking very little risk with these companies.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'A/A2'

The ratings assigned by the various ratings agencies are based primarily upon the insurer's or issuer's creditworthiness. This rating can therefore be interpreted as a direct measure of the probability of default. However, credit stability and priority of payment are also factored into the rating.

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