Average Annual Growth Rate - AAGR

DEFINITION of 'Average Annual Growth Rate - AAGR'

The average increase in the value of an individual investment or portfolio over the period of a year. It is calculated by taking the arithmetic mean of the growth rate over two annual periods. The average annual growth rate can be calculated for any investment, but will not include any measure of the investment's overall risk, as measured by its price volatility.

BREAKING DOWN 'Average Annual Growth Rate - AAGR'

For example, if your portfolio grows 10% one year and 20% the next, your AAGR would be 15%. To this end, fluctuations in the portfolio's rate of return between the beginning of the first year and the end of the year are not included in the calculations, which may lead to some measurement error.

To reduce any possible measurement error, an analyst can simply take the average price at the beginning and end of the two measurement periods, and use those average prices to determine each year's return, and then the AAGR.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Compound Annual Growth Rate - CAGR

    The Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) is the mean annual growth ...
  2. Compound Net Annual Rate - CNAR

    The return on an investment after taking tax implications into ...
  3. Portfolio

    A grouping of financial assets such as stocks, bonds and cash ...
  4. Volatility

    1. A statistical measure of the dispersion of returns for a given ...
  5. Sustainable Growth Rate - SGR

    The maximum growth rate that a firm can sustain without having ...
  6. Risk

    The chance that an investment's actual return will be different ...
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    The Uses And Limits Of Volatility

    Check out how the assumptions of theoretical risk models compare to actual market performance.
  2. Forex Education

    Compound Annual Growth Rate: What You Should Know

    The CAGR is a good and valuable tool to evaluate investment options, but it does not tell the whole story.
  3. Economics

    Selecting A Second-Tier Company

    Find out why an industry's "little guys" can be big winners.
  4. Economics

    Understanding Cost-Volume Profit Analysis

    Business managers use cost-volume profit analysis to gauge the profitability of their company’s products or services.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    5 Must-Have Metrics For Value Investors

    Focusing on certain fundamental metrics is the best way for value investors to cash in gains. Here are the most important metrics to know.
  6. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The 4 Best American Funds for Growth Investors in 2016

    Discover four excellent growth funds from American Funds, one of the country's premier mutual fund families with a history of consistent returns.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The 4 Best Vanguard Funds for Growth Investors in 2016

    Discover four mutual funds managed by the Vanguard Group that would be attractive for investors interested in investing in growth stocks in 2016.
  8. Stock Analysis

    3 Reasons to Invest in Frontier Markets in 2016

    Learn why investing in frontier markets will be a great long-term investment as these markets grow in ways that will propel them to success in the future.
  9. Stock Analysis

    The Top 5 Financial Penny Stocks for 2016 (CPSS, ASRV)

    Learn about some of the most promising penny stocks in the financial services sector that investors can consider adding to their portfolio for 2016.
  10. Investing Basics

    How to Analyze a Company's Inventory

    Discover how to analyze a company's inventory by understanding different types of inventory and doing a quantitative and qualitative assessment of inventory.
RELATED FAQS
  1. When computing the PEG ratio for a stock, how is a company's earnings growth rate ...

    Remember that the price/earnings to growth ratio (PEG ratio) is simply a given stock's price/earnings ratio (P/E ratio) divided ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can working capital affect a company's finances?

    Working capital, or total current assets minus total current liabilities, can affect a company's longer-term investment effectiveness ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
  2. Flight To Quality

    The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This ...
  3. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
  4. Ponzimonium

    After Bernard Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme was revealed, many new (smaller-scale) Ponzi schemers became exposed. Ponzimonium ...
  5. Quarterly Earnings Report

    A quarterly filing made by public companies to report their performance. Included in earnings reports are items such as net ...
Trading Center