Abandonment Value

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DEFINITION of 'Abandonment Value'

The value of a project or asset if it were immediately liquidated or sold. The abandonment value of an asset or project can vary for a variety of reasons including liquidity, supply-demand factors and implied fair value appraisals performed by certified appraisers.

Also referred to as the liquidation value.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Abandonment Value'

The abandonment value is generally a cash value, or equivalent, associated with an asset. This value is important for companies when analyzing the profitability of particular projects or assets and deciding whether they should be maintained or abandoned. Abandonment values are also an important factor in bankruptcy proceedings, where assets are typically sold at distressed or liquidation prices.

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