Abend

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DEFINITION

An unexpected end to a computer program that results in the system crashing or closing down. Derived from the abbreviated version of the term "abnormal end", abend crashes in a business setting can cost companies a significant amount of money. This is why many information technology (IT) departments spend a lot of resources to detect and correct bugs in software.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

An abnormal end, rather than a planned termination, of a computer program may either be due to an easily resolved problem (such as insufficient memory) or on account of a technical glitch that is difficult to identify. The term "abend" is an archaic one that is more commonly used with reference to older mainframe computers such as the IBM 360, rather than modern desktops and laptops.


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