Abnormal Earnings Valuation Model


DEFINITION of 'Abnormal Earnings Valuation Model'

A method for determining a company's worth that is based on book value and earnings. Also known as the residual income model, it looks at whether management's decisions cause a company to perform better or worse than anticipated. The model says that investors should pay more than book value if earnings are higher than expected and less than book value if earnings are lower than expected

BREAKING DOWN 'Abnormal Earnings Valuation Model'

There are numerous other methods for valuing companies, including P/E ratio, price-to-book value ratio, return on equity, return on capital employed and discounted cash flow. Investors and analysts should not place too much emphasis on any one of these (or a number of other) measures of value because no single method can provide a complete picture of a company's financial performance.

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    The process of determining the economic value of a business or ...
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  4. Valuation Analysis

    A form of fundamental analysis that looks to compare the valuation ...
  5. Valuation

    The process of determining the current worth of an asset or company. ...
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    Valuing a company by determining what its divisions would be ...
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