Absolute Beneficiary

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DEFINITION of 'Absolute Beneficiary'

A designation of a beneficiary that can not be changed without the written consent of that beneficiary. Also referred to as an "irrevocable beneficiary", absolute beneficiaries can also refer to a trust, an employee benefit plan such as a pension, or any other instrument or contract with a beneficiary clause.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Absolute Beneficiary'

The naming of absolute beneficiaries is common in divorce settlements or liability cases where part of the settlement is the naming of a given person as a beneficiary. Any designations of absolute beneficiaries should be made very carefully and with professional consultation.

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