Absolute Interest


DEFINITION of 'Absolute Interest'

Total and complete ownership of an asset or property. An individual with an absolute interest has both a legal and beneficial possession of said asset or property. The term "absolute interest" indicates that the owner's interest is not diluted by another party's ownership, nor is it dependent on conditions that must be fulfilled.

BREAKING DOWN 'Absolute Interest'

An absolute interest in an asset or property gives the owner full entitlement to the benefits and privileges that accrue from such ownership. It is the opposite of a contingent interest, which confers an ownership interest only upon the fulfillment of certain conditions or the occurrence of specific circumstances.

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  3. Does working capital include inventory?

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  4. Does working capital include salaries?

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