Accelerated Share Repurchase - ASR


DEFINITION of 'Accelerated Share Repurchase - ASR'

A specific method by which corporations can repurchase outstanding shares of their stock. The accelerated share repurchase (ASR) is usually accomplished by the corporation purchasing shares of its stock from an investment bank. The investment bank borrows the shares from clients or share lenders and sells them to the company. The shares are returned to the client through purchases in the open market, often purchased over a period that can range from one day to several months.

BREAKING DOWN 'Accelerated Share Repurchase - ASR'

Accelerated share repurchases allow corporations to transfer the risk of the stock buyback to the investment bank in return for a premium. The corporation is therefore able to immediately transfer a predetermined amount of money to the investment bank in return for its shares of stock. ASRs are often used to buy shares back at a faster pace and reduce the amount of shares outstanding right away.

  1. Outstanding Shares

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  2. Repurchase Agreement - Repo

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  3. Buyback

    The repurchase of outstanding shares (repurchase) by a company ...
  4. Share Repurchase

    A program by which a company buys back its own shares from the ...
  5. Reverse Repurchase Agreement

    The purchase of securities with the agreement to sell them at ...
  6. Direct Repurchase

    The buying of shares in a publicly-traded company by the company ...
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