Accelerated Depreciation

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DEFINITION of 'Accelerated Depreciation'

Any method of depreciation used for accounting or income tax purposes that allows greater deductions in the earlier years of the life of an asset.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accelerated Depreciation'

The straight-line depreciation method spreads the cost evenly over the life of an asset. On the other hand, a method of accelerated depreciation like the double declining balance (DDB) allows you to deduct far more in the first years after purchase.

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