Acceptance Of Office By Trustee

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DEFINITION of 'Acceptance Of Office By Trustee'

A mutual understanding that a person has with the estate that implies they will assume administrative duties after being nominated. Acceptance of office by trustee is basically a formal way of giving consent to serve as a trustee. After being nominated, a trustee may decline to serve but cannot decline after accepting, nor delegate the responsibility.

BREAKING DOWN 'Acceptance Of Office By Trustee'

A trustee is a person or institution who has legal title to hold property on behalf of the recipient. They act on the behalf of the beneficiary and are allowed to make decisions based on their professional criteria and best judgment.

Once they accept the office, many trustees serve on a voluntary basis without receiving payment for their work. Some of their duties include handling a trust's affairs, ensuring that it is solvent and well managed, and delivering the outcomes and benefits that were originally set out for the trust. Trustees also prepare reports on the trusts and make sure that the trust complies with the law, among many other responsibilities.

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