Acceptance Testing

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DEFINITION of 'Acceptance Testing'

A functional trial performed on a product before it is put on the market or delivered to the purchaser. The acceptance testing process is designed to replicate the anticipated real-life use of the product to ensure that what the consumer or end user receives is fully functional and meets their needs and expectations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Acceptance Testing'

The acceptance testing process acts as a form of quality control to identify problems and defects at a stage where any issues can still be corrected relatively painlessly. The term "acceptance testing" is commonly used in the field of engineering, particularly in reference to software testing or mechanical hardware testing.

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