Accident-Year Statistics


DEFINITION of 'Accident-Year Statistics'

A statistic used by insurance companies to gauge what percentage of the premiums received are being paid out in claims. Accident-year statistics are a measure of the total losses against the total revenue (both deductibles and premiums).

BREAKING DOWN 'Accident-Year Statistics'

It is a useful tool with regards to setting the premiums for the following year. In watching the trends of the accident-year statistics, insurance companies are able to forecast what their losses are likely to be, and therefore, decide what premiums to charge in order to make a profit.

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