Accidental High Yielder

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DEFINITION of 'Accidental High Yielder'

A stock that carries an abnormally high dividend yield for the specific firm. An accidental high yielder is a stock of a company that was not intended to pay an excessive dividend yield;. however, the dividend yield rose when the price of the stock fell while the actual dividend payout remained constant. The adjustment of this ratio therefore causes the stock to be classified as such.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accidental High Yielder'

Accidental high yielders become more common during bear markets, when stock prices decline. Some companies prevent their stocks from falling into this category by lowering their dividends. These stocks can also provide at attractive total return for investors who purchase them at their depressed prices and then reap capital gains in addition to the dividends when prices rise.

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