Accommodative Monetary Policy

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DEFINITION of 'Accommodative Monetary Policy'

When a central bank (such as the Federal Reserve) attempts to expand the overall money supply to boost the economy when growth is slowing (as measured by GDP). This is done to encourage more spending from consumers and businesses by making money less expensive to borrow by lowering the interest rate. Furthermore, the Federal Reserve also has the authority to purchase Treasuries on the open market to infuse capital into a weakening economy.

Also known as an "easy monetary policy".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accommodative Monetary Policy'

The Federal Reserve adopted an accommodative monetary policy during the late stages of the bear market that began in late 2000. When the economy finally showed signs of a rebound, the Fed eased up on the accommodative measures, eventually moving to a tight monetary policy in 2003.

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