Account Activity

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DEFINITION of 'Account Activity'

A banking term that refers to any activity that creates a debit or credit in an account. In a bank account, this would include deposits and withdrawals. In a brokerage account, it would include buy and sell transactions, dividends, interest, etc. Account activity can also refer to debits and credits in a company or organization's accounting records.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Account Activity'

Account activity can also include entries that are not generated by the account holder, such as debits for fees or interest deductions, or credits for interest and dividends. The summary of all account activity comprises the account history. The account balance is the picture of the account summary at a given point in time.

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