DEFINITION of 'Account Executive'

This term refers a person who has primary responsibility for an account, whether it be for an individual or corporate client. It is used often in the advertising and public relations business, but can also be used in financial services businesses.

BREAKING DOWN 'Account Executive'

An account executive may have a team of people or may be a sole operator. In a brokerage firm, for example, it may be the primary broker for an individual client or for a corporate client. It is that broker who must know the client, for example. The term implies decision-making authority over the firm's activities with that client.

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