Account Supervisor

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DEFINITION of 'Account Supervisor'

An individual who oversees the handling of corporate client accounts and generally supervises a number of account executives. It is a middle-management position that requires a number of years of relevant work experience. This job title is common in the advertising and media relations businesses.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Account Supervisor'

Primary responsibilities of an account supervisor are to ensure that high-quality service is being provided to client accounts through the account executives and to enhance client relationships. Project management, strategic vision and industry knowledge are necessary attributes for this position.

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