Accountant International Study Group - AISG


DEFINITION of 'Accountant International Study Group - AISG'

An organization that studied the differences in accounting practices between various countries. The Accountant International Study Group was formed in 1966 by professionals from Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. By 1973, the group expanded its membership to include international accounting standards. The group then folded into the International Accounting Standards Committee (IASC) in 1973, which was reorganized under the International Federation of Accountants and eventually became the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB).

BREAKING DOWN 'Accountant International Study Group - AISG'

The Accountant International Study Group helped set the stage for the harmonization of accounting standards across member countries, which helped make the analysis of financial statements easier and adjustments to accounting principles more thorough.

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  1. Do dividends affect working capital?

    Regardless of whether cash dividends are paid or accrued, a company's working capital is reduced. When cash dividends are ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do prepayments provide working capital?

    Prepayments, or prepaid expenses, are typically included in the current assets on a company's balance sheet, as they represent ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Are dividends considered an expense?

    Cash or stock dividends distributed to shareholders are not considered an expense on a company's income statement. Stock ... Read Full Answer >>

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