Accounting Convention

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DEFINITION of 'Accounting Convention'

Guidelines that arise from the practical application of accounting principles. An accounting convention is not a legally-binding practice; rather, it is a generally-accepted convention based on customs, and is designed to help accountants overcome practical problems that arise out of the preparation of financial statements. As customs change, so to will accounting conventions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accounting Convention'

If an oversight organization, such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) or the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) set forth a guideline that addresses the same topic as the accounting convention, the accounting convention will no longer be applicable. Basically, conventions fill in the gaps between guidelines and practical usage.

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