Accounting Hall Of Fame

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DEFINITION of 'Accounting Hall Of Fame'

A prominent award in the field of accounting. The Accounting Hall of Fame was started by Ohio State University in 1950. The award is highly selective, and is given only to very prominent accountants who have made "lasting contributions to the field."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accounting Hall Of Fame'

The nominations for the award are made by a member board of up to 50 members with expertise in a variety of different segments of accounting. The award winner is then selected by the accounting faculty of Ohio State University. Through 2008, the Accounting Hall of Fame was composed of 85 members. The hall includes both academics and practitioners.



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