Accounting Measurement

What is 'Accounting Measurement'

The computation of economic or financial activities in terms of money, hours or other units. An accounting measurement is a unit of some measurable element that is used to compare and evaluate accounting data.


Accounting is often measured in terms of money; for example, when a company records weekly sales at $10,000. The same company could record those transactions in terms of units sold; for instance 5,000 units (of $2.00 products).

BREAKING DOWN 'Accounting Measurement'

Accounting is often quantified in terms of money but can also be recorded in terms of alternative units, number of labor hours, number of jobs created, etc. The different accounting measurements provide a better view of the overall health of the corporation by allowing varying methods of comparison and evaluation.

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