Accounting Policies

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DEFINITION of 'Accounting Policies'

The specific policies and procedures used by a company to prepare its financial statements. These include any methods, measurement systems and procedures for presenting disclosures. Accounting policies differ from accounting principles in that the principles are the rules and the policies are a company's way of adhering to the rules.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accounting Policies'

Accounting principles are lenient at times, so the policies of a company can be very important. Looking into a specific company's accounting policies can signal whether management is conservative or aggressive when reporting earnings. This should be taken into account by investors when reviewing earnings reports. Also, outside accountants that are hired to review a company's financial statements should check the company's policies to ensure they conform to accounting principles.

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