Accounting Valuation

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DEFINITION of 'Accounting Valuation'

The process of valuing a company's assets for financial-reporting purposes. Several accounting-valuation methods are used while preparing financial statements in order to value assets. Many valuation methods are stipulated by accounting rules, such as the need to use an accepted options model to value the options that a company grants to employees. Other assets are valued simply by the price paid, such as real estate.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accounting Valuation'

Accounting valuation is important, because the value of assets on a company's financial statements needs to be reliable. Analysis of this valuation is just as important as the valuation itself. Some assets, such as real estate, which is carried at cost less depreciation, can be carried on the balance sheet at far from their true value.

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