Accounting Insolvency


DEFINITION of 'Accounting Insolvency'

A situation where the value of a company's liabilities exceeds its assets. Accounting insolvency looks only at the firm's balance sheet, deeming a company "insolvent on the books" when its net worth appears negative.

BREAKING DOWN 'Accounting Insolvency'

Accounting insolvency is a different approach to standard insolvency. The latter involves a firm missing or being unable to make a debt-servicing payment, while the former examines the firm's balance sheet.

When a firm appears to be insolvent on the books, it is likely the debtholders will force a response. The company may attempt to restructure the business to alleviate its debt obligations, or be placed in bankruptcy by the debtholders.

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  1. Can working capital be negative?

    Working capital can be negative if a company's current assets are less than its current liabilities. Working capital is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do I read and analyze an income statement?

    The income statement, also known as the profit and loss (P&L) statement, is the financial statement that depicts the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Does working capital include prepaid expenses?

    The calculation for working capital includes any prepaid expenses that are due within one year, since such prepaid expenses ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Does working capital include short-term debt?

    Short-term debt is considered part of a company's current liabilities and is included in the calculation of working capital. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Do dividends affect working capital?

    Regardless of whether cash dividends are paid or accrued, a company's working capital is reduced. When cash dividends are ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Do prepayments provide working capital?

    Prepayments, or prepaid expenses, are typically included in the current assets on a company's balance sheet, as they represent ... Read Full Answer >>

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