Accounting Method


DEFINITION of 'Accounting Method'

The method by which income and expenses are reported for taxation purposes. The Internal Revenue Service requires taxpayers to choose an accounting method that accurately reflects their income and to be consistent in their choice of accounting method from year to year. IRS approval is required to change methods. The chosen accounting method is based on regulation and tax minimization strategies.

BREAKING DOWN 'Accounting Method'

The two primary accounting methods in North America are cash and accrual accounting. Cash accounting reports income and expenses in the year they are received and paid; accrual accounting reports income and expenses in the year they are earned and incurred.

Cash, accrual, special and hybrid methods are all allowable choices if specified requirements are met.

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    Accrual accounting is an accounting method that measures the ...
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    An accounting technique used by firms to assess the profits earned ...
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  1. How does accrual accounting differ from cash basis accounting?

    The main difference between accrual and cash basis accounting is the timing of when revenue and expenses are recognized. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do dividends affect working capital?

    Regardless of whether cash dividends are paid or accrued, a company's working capital is reduced. When cash dividends are ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do prepayments provide working capital?

    Prepayments, or prepaid expenses, are typically included in the current assets on a company's balance sheet, as they represent ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>

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