Accounts Payable Subsidiary Ledger

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DEFINITION of 'Accounts Payable Subsidiary Ledger'

An accounting ledger that shows the transaction history and amounts owed separately for each supplier from whom the business receives credit for purchases. The balance in the customer accounts is periodically reconciled with the accounts payable (AP) balance in the general ledger to ensure accuracy. The AP subsidiary ledger is also commonly referred to as the AP subledger or subaccount.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accounts Payable Subsidiary Ledger'

The utility of the accounts payable subsidiary ledger lies in the fact that it can show at a glance the amounts owed to a specific supplier. For example, the general balance may show a total accounts payable balance of $50,000, but it will not show which supplier is owed how much. This information can be gleaned from the accounts payable subsidiary ledger.

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