Accounts Payable Subsidiary Ledger

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DEFINITION of 'Accounts Payable Subsidiary Ledger'

An accounting ledger that shows the transaction history and amounts owed separately for each supplier from whom the business receives credit for purchases. The balance in the customer accounts is periodically reconciled with the accounts payable (AP) balance in the general ledger to ensure accuracy. The AP subsidiary ledger is also commonly referred to as the AP subledger or subaccount.

BREAKING DOWN 'Accounts Payable Subsidiary Ledger'

The utility of the accounts payable subsidiary ledger lies in the fact that it can show at a glance the amounts owed to a specific supplier. For example, the general balance may show a total accounts payable balance of $50,000, but it will not show which supplier is owed how much. This information can be gleaned from the accounts payable subsidiary ledger.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Are accounts payable an asset?

    Accounts payable is considered a current liability, not an asset, on the balance sheet. The value listed next to accounts ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are accounts payable counted as revenue?

    In financial accounting, revenue entries are made in the general ledger whenever a business receives, or expects to receive, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Should companies break out accounts receivables into subledgers?

    All companies that sell on credit should have subledgers for their accounts receivables, especially if the company also acts ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
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    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>

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