Accounts Receivable Insurance

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DEFINITION of 'Accounts Receivable Insurance'

A form of credit insurance offered by commercial insurers to businesses. Accounts receivable insurance can take the form of multi-buyer insurance (a pool of receivables) or key buyer insurance.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accounts Receivable Insurance'

Accounts receivable insurance can be particularly useful for new or rapidly growing businesses that cannot afford to do credit checks. For a relatively low fee, accounts receivable insurance protects a company against loss on receivables, including default, bankruptcy or simply slow payment.

This insurance can also protect a company that is unable to collect receivables due to loss of the underlying records (for example, in a fire).

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  3. Why are insurance companies and pension funds considered financial instruments?

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  5. What is the difference between an operating expense and a capital expense?

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